National 3D Printing Day

assembledA few weeks ago the Studio 300 Makerbot 3D printer was busy with a large patron project – printing the segments to the Key to Time from the original Doctor Who series, starring the Fourth Doctor, Tom Baker. There were six pieces in all.

“I was very happy with how these 3D prints turned out,” our patron told us later. “But give proper credit for the designs, done by a person who goes by ‘Dalex.'”

Here’s the process that resulted in the finished model: “I converted the SketchUp models to STL and brought them to the Studio.  There we scaled the model down to about 83% so it would fit onto the print bed.  100% scale was right on the edge of the print bed so scaling was a good idea.”segments

“Next, I created a quick stand out of card board so that the pieces would stay together for display.  There’s some slight warping to some of the points of the segments.  I’ll either file it down or try to bend it back a bit with a heat gun.  It’s very slight but just enough to create small little gaps.  Eventually I’ll print a 3D version of the stand to go along with the Key, but I have to model it first!”

Join us for National 3D Print Day on December 3 in Studio 300 and learn more about this exciting technology.
3D Day

 

3D Printed Guitar Stand

The 3D printer in Studio 300 has seen a lot of action in the past 2 1/2 years.

mb3d

MakerBot 3D Printer

We have printed some pretty cool stuff for our patrons. Occasionally, a patron asks for something unique and the results can be amazing. That’s the case with this guitar stand pictured..

guitar stand 1      giutar stand 2

Designed completely from scratch, we printed 3 pieces at an 80% fill (almost solid plastic) and our patron then painted the finished items black.  When combined with several other pieces, the stand is complete.

guitar stand 3 fixed

Completed Guitar Stand

Printing useful objects is what 3D printing is all about.  The Studio 300 3D printer offers almost endless possibilities in the 3D world.  If you’re new to 3D printing, check out the Makerbot or stop by Studio 300 for a first hand look at this exciting technology!

New 3D Printer Filament

3D filamentStudio 300 recently added several new filaments for use with our 3D printer.

The new colors are Blue Glow (it glows in the dark!), Red, Orange, Magenta, Gold and Green. You can create your own 3D models using the free program Sketchup. Or use a pre-existing design by visiting thingiverse.com.

3D models cost 10 cents per gram after it is printed and weighed.

Digital Learning Day

Learn Blocks On Computer Screen Showing Online Kids EducationJoin us on Wednesday, February 4th for Digital Learning Day in Studio 300. Gain new skills or enhance those skills you already have. We are hosting several classes during that day. Click the links below for more information and to register. You can also call (630) 685-4260 to register. (Spaces are limited and classes do fill).

Also, all of these classes qualify for our on-going Passport to Success Program.

 

New Flexible 3D Prints

output_JGy8AkWe are excited to announce the addition of new, flexible plastic for our 3D printer. Instead of the hard plastic models, you now have the option to print  rubber-like models as the image shows. Right now we only have the color red, but we plan to add more colors in the future. The flexible plastic costs slightly higher at $0.20 per gram.

Stop by Studio 300 to see (and squeeze) the new choice and consider using it on your next 3D print project.

Gift making in Studio 300

christmas-tree-1_green-021114-ykwv1Surprise your family and friends with one-of-a-kind gifts that you create in Studio 300. Here are some ideas:

  • Retouch an old family photo and share digital files or print on photo paper using our high-quality printer (you can even make a poster!)
  • Take a family portrait.
  • Find a pre-built model on Thingiverse and print it using our 3D printer (or create your own unique design and print that).
  • Record your family singing holiday songs or just a special message and then make a CD.
  • Convert that old VHS tape to DVD and share copies with others.
  • And more.

These all make heartfelt gifts and are easy and inexpensive. For more ideas and to get started on your project, stop by Studio 300 today.

3D Printed … Houses?

Adipose, house, and a leaf textured cup created on Studio 300's 3D printer.

Adipose, house, and a leaf textured cup created on Studio 300’s 3D printer.

3D printing continues to be a popular phenomenon This technology has changed from large industrial companies using it for their products to at-home hobbyists 3D printing fun characters, small models, and even reusable cups. No longer do we have to wait for things to be available in stores. You can 3D print at home and start using it right away.

And now you can even 3D print a full-sized home!

A large 3D printer is laying down cement for creating the framing of the house. This is similar to smaller 3D printers that use plastic filament to create objects.

A large 3D printer is laying down cement for creating the framing of the house. This is similar to smaller 3D printers that use plastic filament to create objects.

WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co. have 3D printed homes in under a day! By using recycled material (industrial/construction wastes) instead of plastic filament, WinSun are able to make several small homes (Length: 150 m x Width: 10 m x Height: 6.6 m) in Shanghai, China. This is just the beginning for WinSun according to Ma YiHe, CEO of WinSun. His plans for the future is to use recycling companies in China as their main resource for 3D printing homes. YiHe feels that this will provide an inexpensive and comfortable living style.

No matter how you look at it, the future is here and changing lives for the better.

 

 

Maker-Breaker Bot

DSC00264 During the holiday season, it is a time for selflessness and caring. A time for being thankful for what we have in our lives. One thing that Studio 300 is thankful for is when our 3D printer works. Although you may see several fun and interesting items made from the 3D printer in Studio 300, what you don’t hear is the back story about the making of these unique plastic creations.

Sometimes the printing doesn’t go quite as planned:

ToplessTardisVaderDSC00281

From clogged extruders, tangled plastic, failed designs, and general havoc – the MakerBot 3D printer can be a stubborn machine. Our solution? Patience and occasionally leaving it some flowers and chocolates while whispering soothing words of encouragement (just kidding).  But when it all goes well, the results are often amazing.

Want to learn more about 3D printing? Check out this new book and plan to attend one of our classes.

Meanwhile, here is a time lapse video of our Makerbot in action videotaped by one of our patrons this past summer.

3D-Printed Rubiks Cube

rubiks cubeJust in case you didn’t feel the 3D printer was cool enough, here’s a 3D-printed Rubiks Cube used to control lights on a building.

Sound complicated? It’s not really. All you need are some electronic components such as a Bluetooth modem, an Arduino,  and some sensors, plus 3D-printed colorless pieces made into a Rubiks Cube all connected to some computer software. (O.K. it’s a little complicated). With all this in place, you’re ready to solve the biggest Rubiks Cube ever!  (Oh yeah, you also need a large building with a lot ( a LOT) of LED lights.

Read about “This Puzzle Facade” by Javier Lloret located in the city of Linz, Austria here. Watch the video below:

Knowing how to make the 3D-printed pieces is a great place to start when contemplating a project this large.  Here at Studio 300 we can show you how to get started.  Check out our program calendar for our 3D Design and Print class that shows how to use Google SketchUp to design your own 3D model.