Saturn 5 Rocket Complete

Saturn 5 model in Studio 300

As we prepare to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, Studio 300 enlisted our CR-10 3D printer to build a 60:1 scale model of the rocket that took us to the moon. Our version of the Saturn 5 stands six feet tall, weighs 2160 grams (4.7 lbs), and took over 200 hours to 3D print.

The original Saturn 5 stood 363 feet tall and weighed 6,400,000 lbs. Its five engines produced 7,616,000 lbs of thrust. Visit Studio 300 anytime to see our completed model.

Coming next? The Apollo Lunar Module.

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Liftoff

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Saturn 5 engines

Maker Lab at Studio 300 Technology Spotlight

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Hic Top CR-10

The Maker Lab at Studio 300 has the Hic Top CR-10 3D Printer available for your  3D project.  The CR-10 can print big models, the max printing size is 300x300x400mm/11x11x15 inches.  Studio 300 has many PLA colors available @ .10 / gram.   Here are the details:

  • Printing Size: 300*300*400mm
  • Printing accuracy:±0.1mm
  • Layer thickness: 0.05-0.4mm (adjustable)
  • Nozzle temp: 250 degree C
  • Extruder temperature: PLA: 210 C
  • Hot bed temperature: PLA: 60 C
  • Printing Speed:Normal: 80mm/s, Max.: 200mm/s
  • Materials:1.75mm PLA
  • Nozzle: 0.4mm

Stop by and check it out.  Studio 300 staff will be on hand to answer questions and help you with your project during open shop hours: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4-8 p.m. and Saturdays, 2-4 p.m.

3D Printed Guitar Stand

The 3D printer in Studio 300 has seen a lot of action in the past 2 1/2 years.

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MakerBot 3D Printer

We have printed some pretty cool stuff for our patrons. Occasionally, a patron asks for something unique and the results can be amazing. That’s the case with this guitar stand pictured..

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Designed completely from scratch, we printed 3 pieces at an 80% fill (almost solid plastic) and our patron then painted the finished items black.  When combined with several other pieces, the stand is complete.

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Completed Guitar Stand

Printing useful objects is what 3D printing is all about.  The Studio 300 3D printer offers almost endless possibilities in the 3D world.  If you’re new to 3D printing, check out the Makerbot or stop by Studio 300 for a first hand look at this exciting technology!

New 3D Printer Filament

3D filamentStudio 300 recently added several new filaments for use with our 3D printer.

The new colors are Blue Glow (it glows in the dark!), Red, Orange, Magenta, Gold and Green. You can create your own 3D models using the free program Sketchup. Or use a pre-existing design by visiting thingiverse.com.

3D models cost 10 cents per gram after it is printed and weighed.

New Flexible 3D Prints

output_JGy8AkWe are excited to announce the addition of new, flexible plastic for our 3D printer. Instead of the hard plastic models, you now have the option to print  rubber-like models as the image shows. Right now we only have the color red, but we plan to add more colors in the future. The flexible plastic costs slightly higher at $0.20 per gram.

Stop by Studio 300 to see (and squeeze) the new choice and consider using it on your next 3D print project.

Maker-Breaker Bot

DSC00264 During the holiday season, it is a time for selflessness and caring. A time for being thankful for what we have in our lives. One thing that Studio 300 is thankful for is when our 3D printer works. Although you may see several fun and interesting items made from the 3D printer in Studio 300, what you don’t hear is the back story about the making of these unique plastic creations.

Sometimes the printing doesn’t go quite as planned:

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From clogged extruders, tangled plastic, failed designs, and general havoc – the MakerBot 3D printer can be a stubborn machine. Our solution? Patience and occasionally leaving it some flowers and chocolates while whispering soothing words of encouragement (just kidding).  But when it all goes well, the results are often amazing.

Want to learn more about 3D printing? Check out this new book and plan to attend one of our classes.

Meanwhile, here is a time lapse video of our Makerbot in action videotaped by one of our patrons this past summer.

3D-Printed Rubiks Cube

rubiks cubeJust in case you didn’t feel the 3D printer was cool enough, here’s a 3D-printed Rubiks Cube used to control lights on a building.

Sound complicated? It’s not really. All you need are some electronic components such as a Bluetooth modem, an Arduino,  and some sensors, plus 3D-printed colorless pieces made into a Rubiks Cube all connected to some computer software. (O.K. it’s a little complicated). With all this in place, you’re ready to solve the biggest Rubiks Cube ever!  (Oh yeah, you also need a large building with a lot ( a LOT) of LED lights.

Read about “This Puzzle Facade” by Javier Lloret located in the city of Linz, Austria here. Watch the video below:

Knowing how to make the 3D-printed pieces is a great place to start when contemplating a project this large.  Here at Studio 300 we can show you how to get started.  Check out our program calendar for our 3D Design and Print class that shows how to use Google SketchUp to design your own 3D model.

3D print alternate materials

mb3dDo you have great 3D design ideas but don’t have the resources to print them? Here at Studio 300 we can help you design those ideas using software such as SketchUp and Blender and then print it with our Makerbot Printer.  We use a plastic filament that’s great for many designs and prototypes.

However, if you’re looking for something to last a long time or be able to eat or drink from, Shapeways is a great site to check out. They offer stainless steel and gold plated brass that’s perfect for jewelry, sandstone that can produce photo-realistic color designs and food safe glazed ceramic. Pricing differs depending on what material and size you choose plus shipping and handling. We recommend you print a plastic prototype here at Studio 300 to test your design before you choose a more expensive material.

Here are a few other articles about 3D printing: