Lamination now at Studio 300

lam

Scotch Laminator

Need something laminated?  Studio 300 can help you.  We just added the Scotch TL901C to our inventory.

This device can laminate up to an 8.5″ x 11″ sheet in less than two minutes. The cost is $1.00 per sheet. If you need to laminate something smaller, we can help you trim it to size with our cutter.  Stop by Studio 300 when you need lamination services.

 

TED2016: Dream Conference Streaming Live at Fountaindale

TV720pAre you interested in this year’s TED2016 conference in Vancouver but can’t afford the $8,500 registration fee? Well you’re in luck! Fountaindale will be streaming part of the conference live for FREE! Throughout the day, you can access four sessions showcasing great thinkers, artists and storytellers from around the country all from the comfort of your library.

TEDxFountaindalePublicLibraryLive

Wednesday, February 17

  • Code power: 10:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m.
  • Imagine there’s no countries: 1:00–2:45 p.m.
  • TED University: 4:15–6:00 p.m.
  • Nightmare?: 7:00–8:45 p.m.

Feel free to stay for the entire live stream or just specific sessions. Light refreshments will be served. Registration is required, but you do not have to be a Fountaindale Public Library cardholder to register. Register now!

Want more TED?

Naperville Public Library and Wheaton Public Library are also streaming additional parts of the conference. Visit their websites for more information and to register.

UPDATE: Here are the speakers scheduled during the February 17 program:

Session 6: Code power

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 10:30am-12:15pm
Linus Torvalds, Software engineer
In 1991, Linus Torvalds shared the Linux kernel with a few computer hobbyists. The operating system they built reshaped the software industry.

Reshma Saujani, Education activist
Through her nonprofit Girls Who Code, Reshma Saujani initiates young women into the tech world. Her goal: one million women in computer science by 2020.

Mary Norris, Copy editor
As a copy editor for the New Yorker, “comma queen” Mary Norris enforces some of the most authoritative (some might say eccentric) style rules in publishing.

Luke DuBois, Artist, composer, engineer
Luke DuBois weaves information from a multitude of sources into art and music exploring the tensions between algorithms, portraiture, and temporal space.

Meron Gribetz, Augmented reality startup CEO
Meron Gribetz is the founder and CEO of Meta, the first company to produce and sell augmented reality (AR) glasses with natural gestural hand recognition.

Dan Gross, Gun-control activist
As president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, Dan Gross seeks to cut US gun deaths in half by 2025.

Raffaello D’Andrea, Autonomous systems pioneer
Raffaello D’Andrea explores the possibilities of autonomous technology by collaborating with artists, engineers and entrepreneurs.

Session 7: Imagine there’s no countries

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 1:00pm-2:45pm
Parag Khanna, Global strategist
Geopolitical futurist Parag Khanna foresees a world in which megacities, supply chains and connective technologies redraw the map away from states and borders.

Dalia Mogahed, Muslim studies scholar
Researcher and pollster Dalia Mogahed is an author, advisor and consultant who studies Muslim communities.

Amit Sood, Technologist
As the director of Google’s Cultural Institute and Art Project, Amit Sood leads the effort to bring cultural artifacts from museums, archives and foundations onto the web in vivid, lifelike detail.

Christiana Figueres, Climate advocate
Christiana Figueres is the executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), who led the recent COP 21 climate talks in Paris.

Hugh Evans, Humanitarian
Through the Global Citizen platform, humanitarian Hugh Evans has created an online community of millions of people — all driven to eradicate extreme poverty by the year 2030.

TED University

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 4:15pm-6:00pm
Attendees take the stage to give their own TED-style talks.

Session 8: Nightmare?

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 7:00pm-8:45pm
Al Gore, Climate advocate
Nobel Laureate Al Gore focused the world’s attention on the global climate crisis. Now he’s showing us how we’re moving towards real solutions.

Andrew Youn, Anti-hunger activist
With One Acre Fund, Andrew Youn helps transform African agriculture by helping farmers overcome the obstacles that hobble their harvests.

Rhiannon Giddens, Musician
With a rich voice and an equally rich sense of history, Rhiannon Giddens animates American folk tradition with her electrifying song interpretations.

Jennifer Kahn, Science journalist
In articles that span the gene-editing abilities of CRISPR, the roots of psychopathic behavior in children, and much more, Jennifer Kahn weaves gripping stories from unlikely sources.

Dan Gross, Gun-control activist
As president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, Dan Gross seeks to cut US gun deaths in half by 2025.

Michael Murphy, Designer
As co-founder and CEO of MASS Design Group, Michael Murphy envisions and creates community-centric structures with healing built into their core.

National 3D Printing Day

assembledA few weeks ago the Studio 300 Makerbot 3D printer was busy with a large patron project – printing the segments to the Key to Time from the original Doctor Who series, starring the Fourth Doctor, Tom Baker. There were six pieces in all.

“I was very happy with how these 3D prints turned out,” our patron told us later. “But give proper credit for the designs, done by a person who goes by ‘Dalex.'”

Here’s the process that resulted in the finished model: “I converted the SketchUp models to STL and brought them to the Studio.  There we scaled the model down to about 83% so it would fit onto the print bed.  100% scale was right on the edge of the print bed so scaling was a good idea.”segments

“Next, I created a quick stand out of card board so that the pieces would stay together for display.  There’s some slight warping to some of the points of the segments.  I’ll either file it down or try to bend it back a bit with a heat gun.  It’s very slight but just enough to create small little gaps.  Eventually I’ll print a 3D version of the stand to go along with the Key, but I have to model it first!”

Join us for National 3D Print Day on December 3 in Studio 300 and learn more about this exciting technology.
3D Day

 

New printing options

Have specialty printing needs? Studio 300 can help.

We lowered our printing prices and added new capabilities. You can print on sizes larger than the typical 8 ½ by 11 paper and even print on glossy photo paper and cardstock. Our poster printer can handle very large sizes – 36” x 48” and beyond. Also, you can now print on canvas which is ideal for portraits and art prints.copperflex

Our 3D printer has many color options including two new choices: a flexible red and metallic copper that you must see to believe.

Click here for the complete list of printing options and prices.

3D Printed Guitar Stand

The 3D printer in Studio 300 has seen a lot of action in the past 2 1/2 years.

mb3d

MakerBot 3D Printer

We have printed some pretty cool stuff for our patrons. Occasionally, a patron asks for something unique and the results can be amazing. That’s the case with this guitar stand pictured..

guitar stand 1      giutar stand 2

Designed completely from scratch, we printed 3 pieces at an 80% fill (almost solid plastic) and our patron then painted the finished items black.  When combined with several other pieces, the stand is complete.

guitar stand 3 fixed

Completed Guitar Stand

Printing useful objects is what 3D printing is all about.  The Studio 300 3D printer offers almost endless possibilities in the 3D world.  If you’re new to 3D printing, check out the Makerbot or stop by Studio 300 for a first hand look at this exciting technology!

Stock photos

Sunflower isolated on white

The popular GraphicStock.com recently added 10,000 stock photos to their already extensive library of stock media. Fountaindale Public Library cardholders get free access to this stock media in Studio 300. Having access to royalty-free stock photos is often requested by our patrons, and we are happy to offer these additional choices. You can browse the media available at GraphicStock, but you can only download the images in Studio 300.

If you need video stock footage and royalty-free music, check out the other sites we provide: VideoBlocks and AudioBlocks.

Screen Shot 2015-06-23 at 4.26.55 PM

 

New 3D Printer Filament

3D filamentStudio 300 recently added several new filaments for use with our 3D printer.

The new colors are Blue Glow (it glows in the dark!), Red, Orange, Magenta, Gold and Green. You can create your own 3D models using the free program Sketchup. Or use a pre-existing design by visiting thingiverse.com.

3D models cost 10 cents per gram after it is printed and weighed.

Fixing Pixelated Printing Problems

Why is it that a picture that looks nice on your computer screen doesn’t look as nice when you print it? This degradation will happen if the resolution of the picture is lower than the size you want to print. Here are some tips to help prevent these kinds of printing disappointments.

Before you print a picture, check out its original size. To do this save your picture to the computer, right click on it, then click on “Properties” if using a PC or “Get Info” if on a Mac. See the pictures below:

imagepropertiesMacGETINFO

For PC users, click on the “Details” tab and scroll down to “Image”. For Mac users, click on the “More Info” arrow. See below:

imagesizeMACscreensize

In both cases, the Width and Height of the image displays. In the examples above, the PC image (left) is 480 pixels for width and 359 for height — or 480 x 359. The Mac example shows 1243 x 902.

Two variables for printing are image Pixel size and the Dots Per Inch (DPI) of the printer which for most printers is 300. Using the formula:

Pixel Width / DPI
Pixel Height / DPI

yields the maximum width and height of your image (in inches). For example, if you want to print a poster-sized image with 18″ x 24″ dimensions, the formula says that your image needs to be 5400 pixels x 7200 pixels — a rather high resolution. It is acceptable to scale down an image but scaling up will result in a distorted, pixelated print. In short, always use higher resolution images when printing.

Photoshop Club

photoshop_logo_wallpaper_by_peterbaumann-d6c88bwThis August Studio 300 will host Club Photoshop.  This on-going club is for beginners, intermediate, and advanced Photoshop users. The first project will be a poster using multiple images, brushes and shapes, and includes Photoshop tools such as masking, typography, and basic compositing.

Club Photoshop is for you to explore techniques beyond our regular Photoshop classes and an opportunity for you to work with and learn from other Photoshop users. Future projects will include photo editing, HDR photos, digital illustration, and so much more. Your suggestions are also encouraged.

Club Photoshop meets the last Wednesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. starting on August 27. Seats are limited so sign up today.

Wonderful Font Resources

dafontOne distinctive and yet often overlooked way to transform, update, and change the look, feel, and mood of a project is the font you select. Media creation software usually includes dozens of classic and popular typefaces. But when ‘Times New Roman’ or ‘Garamond’ just won’t do, turn to these resources for finding, building, downloading, and then using new and exciting fonts.

  • Dafont.com is a user submission-based font resource with thousands of free fonts ready to download at the click of a mouse. Its friendly design lets you instantly dive into the seemingly endless sea of fonts. They have themed categories to narrow down your search and a ‘New Fonts’ area that lets you see the latest submissions.   You can even submit and preview your own custom text in each font which is a good way to help you select the perfect font for your project. Each font has its own usage permissions, set by the owner/submitter, so take note of any restriction as you download and use them.
  • 1001freefonts works similarly, but gives you a different selection of fonts along with the ability to ‘pin’ your favorites. This lets you browse for hours (don’t say we didn’t warn you!), choose the ones you like, and recall all the pinned fonts when you’re finished.
  • Know the look of the font you need, but can’t remember its name? Or maybe you have a small sampling, but still are unsure? Identifont has a database of popularly used and recognized fonts and some more obscure choices. Search by name, by looking at similar fonts, by publisher or designer, or use their unique quiz method to narrow your choices.
  • Whatthefont is ideal for times when you have a graphic sampling (jpeg, gif, png, etc.) but can’t identify the font. This often happens with logos. Its easy upload process scans, separates letters/symbols, and finds the font that fits closest to your submission.  whatthefontTheir database will find the best match and will give you a list of alternatives and links to where you can purchase and/or download each typeface or font family.  Of course there are some restrictions to the file you choose to upload, however Whatthefont is surprisingly accurate.